ARDC in the News

Mentions of Amateur Radio Digital Communications on websites, podcasts, social media, and newspapers.


Linux in the Ham Shack Episode #418: ARDC Deep Dive

June 28, 2021 – In this episode, Rosy, KJ7RYV, and John, K7VE, talk about the history and mission of ARDC, including our grant program for amateur radio projects, available resources for grantees, and more. 


Linux in the HamShack Episode #415: Open Research Institute Deep Dive 2

June 10, 2021 – In this episode, Michelle, W5NYV, of the Open Research Institute first mentions ARDC and the funding provided by ARDC at about the 29:30 point, and for the next 10 minutes, talks about how ORI funds their projects. ARDC is a big part of that discussion. At the 38:30 point, Michelle says, “[ARDC] is absolutely game-changing…..It’s huge….Over time, [ARDC] will change amateur radio in a dramatic way.”


ARDC Grant Will Support HAMNET Expansion in Europe – ARRL

June 8, 2021 – Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) has awarded a grant to support European expansion of HAMNET, a high-speed digital network that interconnects automated amateur radio stations using links in the 13-, 6-, and 3-centimeter bands, the Deutscher Amateur Radio Club (DARC) reports. This marks the first international grant from ARDC since it began awarding grants in 2019….more


Hackaday Links: May 23, 2021

In other architectural news, perched atop Building 54 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus in Cambridge for the last 55 years has been a large, fiberglass geodesic sphere, known simply as The Radome. It’s visible from all over campus, and beyond; we used to work in Kendall Square, and the golf-ball-like structure was an important landmark for navigating the complex streets of Cambridge. The Radome was originally used for experiments with weather radar, but fell out of use as the technology it helped invent moved on. That led to plans to remove the iconic structure, which consequently kicked off a “Save the Radome” campaign. The effort is being led by the students and faculty members of the MIT Radio Society, who have put the radome to good use over the years — it currently houses an amateur radio repeater, and the Radio Society uses the dish within it to conduct Earth-Moon-Earth (EME) microwave communications experiments. The students are serious — they applied for and received a $1.6-million grant from Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) to finance their efforts. The funds will be used to renovate the deteriorating structure.


Saving the radiome

MIT News, May 7, 2021 – “We were overwhelmed at first by the amount we needed to raise, and the short time we had before the renovation project needed to begin. We just had to hope that someone would see the same promise and potential in the dish that we did,” says Gregory Allan, a PhD student in the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics who led ARDC grant submission efforts. “When we contacted ARDC, they were so supportive and willing to do whatever it took to make this happen. We’re really grateful to them for this incredible gift.”


ARRL Foundation Announces Matching Scholarship Grants by Amateur Radio Digital Communications

March 3, 2020 – ARRL Foundation President Dr. David Woolweaver, K5RAV, announced this week that the non-profit Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC) has generously agreed to award a grant to the ARRL Foundation to match the Foundation’s 2020-2021 scholarships on a dollar-for-dollar basis, up to a total of $200,000….more